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On the farm - Off in the distance
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May 2016
 

The Bellinghman
Date: 2010-08-12 21:46
Subject: On the farm
Security: Public
Location:Wimpole Hall
Tags:wimpole community farm
The rain we've been having is finally beginning to have some effect. The potatoes, which were on the verge of drying out, now have plenty of moisture round their roots, and the tubers have swelled from the size of marbles up to plausible new potato size. We actually brought two home last night and cooked them this evening, and steamed, they tasted not bad at all. It's a way from them really being ready for harvest, but they're distinctly potato-scented potatoes, unlike those scrubbed things you tend to encounter in the shops.

The French beans are still doing well, with about a kilo of beans coming from each picking. There are two varieties, and it's the Purple Queen ones (yes, they are purple, not green at all until they're cooked) which are doing particularly well.

The runner beans are still climbing their poles, and there's no sign of fruiting pods yet, but that takes time.

The courgettes are beginning to show. The flowers are full sized, and behind some of them are the initial spherical swellings which will eventually stretch out, like a sausage balloon being inflated, until they're properly ready to pick.

On the salads, the lettuces which we at first thought were dead in the ground finally germinated and now look like real lettuces. As for the spinach - that's doing very nicely thank you.

On the down side, the brassicas have been hit hard by white fly. Although there are lots of ladybirds around now, they weren't earlier, and lacking an effective pesticidal spray, the whitefly have been gorging themselves. We planted a lot, and it's probably just as well, as whether we get any at the end is at this point something I'm not prepared to guarantee.

In a week or so, we'll start planting seeds for next year's early crops: garlic, turnips and onions. This year we were late for most crops, with many being put in as plugs. These are more work to plant, and they cost more, since someone has had to raise them from seed in the first place.
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