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#231 Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Sid - Off in the distance — LiveJournal
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The Bellinghman
Date: 2008-02-04 22:45
Subject: #231 Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Sid
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Tags:books, reviews
Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd (6 April 2006)
ISBN-10: 0141019018
ISBN-13: 978-0141019017
Category(ies): Economics

Economics is often called 'the dismal science'. And yet, the 'sixth Nobel' is awarded for work in it. It's deeply important to our lives, yet it often seems to be black magic, with competing theories about everything, theories usually phrased in impenetrable jargon. So it's quite a surprise to see this book, which is an attempt to bring out the economic underpinnings behind everyday experiences. What the authors have put forward (or more precisely, what economist Levitt has put forward, while Dubner actually provides the journalistic polish) is a set of theories, from the effect of names of a child's earning power to the economics of running a drigs gang (pretty lousy, it seems).

Fascinating. Not necessarily always right, but definitely thought provoking.
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Perdita
User: perdita_fysh
Date: 2008-02-04 23:04 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
What bits were wrong ooi?
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2008-02-05 12:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
There is some debate particularly about the abortion one (well, there would be, wouldn't there). Depending on how the figures are run on that one, the effect runs between the Levitt figures and a small percentage thereof.

I am not a statistician, nor do I play one in popular TV dramas.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2008-02-05 12:49 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
That too - which is the trap that statistics can lead you to fall into.
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