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Why music piracy will continue - Off in the distance
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May 2016
 

The Bellinghman
Date: 2010-10-15 11:02
Subject: Why music piracy will continue
Security: Public
From this BBC News article:
Jonathan Shalit, who discovered Charlotte Church and manages N Dubz and Russell Watson, described it as a "totally ridiculous suggestion".

"Right now if you buy a bottle of water it's £1," he said. "A piece of music is a valuable form of art. If you want the person to respect it and value it, it's got to cost them not a huge sum of money but a significant sum of money."
This in reply to Rob Dickens, former UK head of Warner Music, who was suggesting slashing the cost of albums to the point that they'd then become impulse buys, and the volume would massively increase.

At £3.00, I will buy a CD on spec.

At £9.00, I won't - it'd have to be something I really want. So I probably won't buy it.

Funnily enough, I've spent much more money recently at the cheaper end. But hey, perhaps Shalit wouldn't want my custom, because I'd have no 'spect for him.
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kit
User: mizkit
Date: 2010-10-15 10:28 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I think slashing the prices is a great idea.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-10-15 10:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Indeed.

£1 may be a lower price that is optimal for turnover, but to dismiss the concept as 'totally ridiculous' shows a total unwillingness to consider whether a much-lower-than-current price might work. It does warrant discussion.

The artists I would worry about are those whose albums aren't easily found in the racks. The Richard Thompson or the Wakeman Anderson 360 CDs, because an impulse buyer won't see them in the first place.
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kit
User: mizkit
Date: 2010-10-15 10:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Well, £3 seems pretty reasonable to me. It doesn't have to be as low as £1. And of course I'm now trying to go digital with my music so I'd want an option for a £3 download. Which I would find, probably, by going to the music shops, browsing, then going home and downloading.

Sadly, as with books, I recognize this is not a sustainable behavior, because one does need the physical items to browse, and if the trend goes too heavily toward downloads there will be less and less /to/ browse.

Flip side of that is I suspect the next generation is a lot better at and more willing to browse online than I am. I mean, a lot of /my/ generation is, so no doubt the next one is even moreso.
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oldbloke
User: oldbloke
Date: 2010-10-15 11:15 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
"£3 seems pretty reasonable to me"

2 for a fiver!
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nojay
User: nojay
Date: 2010-10-15 12:50 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
If Mr. Dickens wishes music to be respected as art and to have a significant cash value then why would he want this music broadcast on radio and TV free to any and all who would listen to it, as many times an hour as possible?

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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-10-15 13:06 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Oh, I'm sure he doesn't. I'm sure he's exerting himself strongly to stop such 'broadcasts'.
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Linz
User: k425
Date: 2010-10-15 14:16 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Is it broadcast free? I thought radio and tv had to pay royalties?
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-10-15 14:20 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
It's how much the recipients are paying, by Dickens's logic, not how much the producers receive.
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Simes
User: bslsimes
Date: 2010-10-15 10:40 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I think that if you want someone to respect and value your product, you probably shouldn't be managing N'Dubz.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-10-15 10:42 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I couldn't possibly comment.

Oh damn, I just did.
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jon_a_five
User: jon_a_five
Date: 2010-10-15 11:28 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Moving the topic over to videogames, Gabe Newell from Valve let slip that for every 10% they drop off the price in the Steam store they *double* the sales. Do the math, music industry.
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Tim Illingworth
User: timill
Date: 2010-10-15 12:51 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Depends how much the CD costs to get to the stores - if it's UKL2, they'd have to sell seven times as many just to break even on the deal.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-10-15 13:20 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Very true. A £1 CD would probably need to come in a card sleeve rather than that fragile brittle plastic jewel case, and with no insert. But we know that newspapers can distribute them free to their readers, so the actual production+distribution cost should be drivable down to the tens of pennies range.

The Complete Mozart box set can be purchased at less than £1/disc (actually, 60p), with free delivery.
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Sheep with a guitar
User: sbp
Date: 2010-10-15 17:36 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I'll buy £3-£5 on impulse at e.g. Foyles, and they're good on having things like Richard Thompson. But that's catalogue prices, I guess - new releases are more expensive.
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ewx
User: ewx
Date: 2010-10-15 19:52 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I am still boggling at the idea that someone from the music industry suggested something that might actually work.
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