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Breakfast - Off in the distance
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May 2016
 

The Bellinghman
Date: 2010-05-19 09:59
Subject: Breakfast
Security: Public
Quince jam, on toasted brioche.

(Hmm, a nice simple recipé for the brioche too.)
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User: furrfu
Date: 2010-05-19 10:51 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
May one enquire as to why you put an accent at the end of "recipe"?

This is the OED's etymology take on "recipe":

[< post-classical Latin recipe formula for the composition or use of a medicine (1519 in the passage translated in quot. 1533 at sense 1), use as noun of classical Latin recipe, 2nd singular imperative of recipere RECEIVE v., used by physicians to head prescriptions (see RECIPE v.). Compare Middle French recipe (a1482; French récipé, {dag}recipé, now rare). Compare earlier RECIPE v. and RECEIPT n. IV.]


Which only has the accent at the end in a now-rare French variant.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-05-19 11:47 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Probably because in English, an unaccented single trailing 'e' is usually not pronounced (as per French). An accented letter is (AFAIK) always pronounced, even in cases where it would normally be silent (e.g. fiancé).

Yes, I'm being too logical.
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User: furrfu
Date: 2010-05-19 11:53 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
But then surely it'd be pronounced "recip-ay" (similar to fiancé), and not "re-ce-pee"?
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-05-19 11:56 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Now you're trying to apply logic. You'll want us to pronounce 'Paris' with no sibilants next.
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User: furrfu
Date: 2010-05-19 11:57 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Well, I don't know of any words where a trailing é is pronounced "ee"...
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-05-19 12:21 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
As they say, absence of knowledge is not knowledge of absence.

(I'm now trying to think of any English word ending in an unaccented trailing 'e' that is pronounced with an 'ee' sound.)

Loan words are always problematic, because the result is almost always different from the original in its pronunciation, and frequently in its orthography too. 'Paris' is an example where the orthography didn't change, but the pronunciation very much did. 'recipe' (no accents) is a case where both have.

I am assuming that the word arrived in English via the French, displacing the traditional term 'receipt'. (Or 'recipt' as Hannah Glasse occasionally spelled it.)
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