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Let them eat cake - Off in the distance
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May 2016
 

The Bellinghman
Date: 2010-04-20 10:18
Subject: Let them eat cake
Security: Public
According to the research reported in this BBC news report on cereals, it'd be healthier.

(No proper control for portion size, mind you.)

I am mildly surprised that Special K, marketted to slimmers as being a healthy option, actually has more than twice the sugar content of good old cornflakes. However, the news that Coco Pops are 37% sugar by weight is no surprise to me. I do hope that no parents believe it's at all healthy for their children.
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Sarcasticia Nitpickerson
User: tisiphone
Date: 2010-04-20 09:25 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
As near as I can tell, Special K is marketed as a diet food by dint of cutting their portion size in half from everyone else's, there's no real nutritional value to it at all. Their astonishingly brilliant weight loss plan is not really so special - eating one real meal a day plus two bowls of cereal will make you lose weight in the short term? Weird!
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-04-20 09:29 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Weird indeed.

(Perhaps doubling the sugar content makes the body not realise the portion is so small, and there is the admitted low fat content.)

(But then the fat content of cornflakes is near zero too.)

(Oh hell, it's marketting. Their brains are special.)
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Nik Whitehead
User: sharikkamur
Date: 2010-04-20 10:51 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
That's horrendous. Especially when it tastes so awful that I have to put sugar on it to make it edible. :( Good job I generally eat corn flakes instead then. :)
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-04-20 09:50 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I think they ran out of stuff about Eyjafjallajoekull (spelling possibly off).

I think it's one of those things that need mentioning occasionally. You and I may know this (though even so, the actual proportions are a bit of a shock in black and white), but if it's not repeated every few years, it's quite possible for people to grow up without knowing these things.
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Korenwolf
User: korenwolf
Date: 2010-04-20 10:19 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
There are only so many times they can say "still closed"
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hesadevil: paddington shopping
User: hesadevil
Date: 2010-04-20 09:37 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:paddington shopping
Finding products with no (or very little) added sugar is increasingly difficult. The low-fat bandwagon has monopolised the public's consciousness about 'healthy eating.'

Sainsbury once offered an own-brand low-sugar high-fibre version of cornflakes but is was withdrawn last year as it 'didn't sell'. Communication with customer services made me realise that the nutritional content is less important to the company than it would have us believe.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-04-20 09:53 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
A while back, we looked at the Atkins diet for a while - the whole low-carb fashion. Wandering along the shelves in the local supermarket, I started checking total sugar content of everything in sight, and I was pretty stunned by just how much there is in so many sauces and prepared foods.
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Megabitch
User: megabitch
Date: 2010-04-20 11:59 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Almost all of them have added dried milk powder.
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The Magician
User: the_magician
Date: 2010-04-20 10:45 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
When I did a total "no added sugar" change to my diet a few years back, I found *two* cereals that didn't have added sugar.

Shredded Wheat was one, can't remember the other ...

... and as Alan says, there's not a soup, sauce or pretty much any other tinned product that doesn't have added sugar in some way (it can be glucose, sucrose, sugar, fruit juice or some other "natural" sweetner, which basically means "hidden sugar")
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Nik Whitehead: Blob
User: sharikkamur
Date: 2010-04-20 10:55 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:Blob
Everything has sugar now, you're right. But when the alternative is aspartame (to which I'm mildly allergic) or the saccharin variants (which taste awful) you just have to live with it.

The more I look at the diet issue the more I become convinced that 'everything in moderation' is the only practical solution.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-04-20 11:00 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
How about just less sugar, and nothing substituting for it.

The problem is that the western palate has been trained to expect really strong flavours, especially of sweetness. When we were in Japan, we initially found the soft drinks almost tasteless, because they're so subtle compared to outs. But after a while, our palates adjusted.
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Nik Whitehead
User: sharikkamur
Date: 2010-04-20 12:01 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Oh yes, we definitely expect stronger flavours, and not just in drinks. The 'all the flavour, half the X' approach seems to be a common marketing theme.

I too would be quite happy if the manufacturers just dropped the sugar. I suspect I wouldn't notice too much, particularly in drinks - I now seldom drink anything other than black coffee or water (although I do sometimes add lime juice to it). The sweet fizzy drinks are just too sweet for me.
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hesadevil: paddington shopping
User: hesadevil
Date: 2010-04-20 11:10 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:paddington shopping
Tell me about it.

I was diagnosed with gestation diabetes over 30 years ago and have stuck pretty much to a 'no added sugar', low-carb diet ever since. Type 2 dieabetes runs in the family but, so far, my blood sugar levels remain normal way past the age that other family members developed the condition.

It's easier than it was to find canned vegetables with no added anything but when in France it's virtually impossible. Strangely, there is one jam manufacturer who uses grape juice instead of sugar - Dalfour, made in France.

Back to the cereals topic, I don't like Shredded Wheat, so make some adjustments to my daily intake of sugar and eat Weetabix (without adding any sugar myself) as it's high in fibre.
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The Magician
User: the_magician
Date: 2010-04-20 11:19 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
I too eat the St.Dalfour's jam ... but it's still 56g of sugar per 100g (Strawberry Jam) ... compare that with, say, Hartley's Best Strawberry Jam (which was here in the kitchen at work) at 61g of sugar per 100g ... it's not really as big a difference as I'd hoped :-( (and 224kcal vs 244kcal, so not even really that much lower in calories either)

http://www.stdalfour.com.au/products.htm#strawberry
http://www.thedailyplate.com/nutrition-calories/food/hartleys/best-strawberry-jam


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hesadevil: paddington shopping
User: hesadevil
Date: 2010-04-20 11:35 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Keyword:paddington shopping
The sugar is all fruit sugar though, which, although it counts when you're on a weight-loss diet, is not as bad for you as jams with refined sugar. A thin smear on toast adds hardly any calories and hardly registers on the daily 'sugar allowance'. I switched to it from 'diabetic' jam which contains sorbitol.

When living in France, we have difficulty finding Dalfour so I buy Bon Maman which is high in fruit. Although it contains more sugar, 100g of jam is one hell of a lot of jam to eat in one sitting.
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Perdita
User: perdita_fysh
Date: 2010-04-20 10:11 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
This is why I find it hard to totally boycott Nestle as they make the best cereal - Shredded Wheat.
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-04-20 10:21 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
At least other manufacturers can make shredded wheat, not just the evil Swiss co.

(Though a quick google indicates that some people don't appreciate the alternatives.)
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oldbloke
User: oldbloke
Date: 2010-04-20 10:27 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Half a tin of baked beans is healthier than 2 bowls of cereal, and will make you feel fuller.
One should never forget that cornflakes, which started the whole cereal thing (apart from porridge), were invented by Mr Kellog not as a healthy start to the day, but as a way of reducing the libido. I think his science was a bit off but that's not the point! I bet I can't find the cite for that now I've said it.
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Just a random swede
User: vatine
Date: 2010-04-20 10:39 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
From Wikipedia:
A follower of Sylvester Graham, the inventor of graham crackers and graham bread and supporter of sexual abstinence, Kellogg believed that spicy or sweet foods would increase passions. In contrast, cornflakes would have an anaphrodisiac property and lower the sex drive.


Not necessarily the most trustworthy source, but there was a mention of it on QI a long good while ago.
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Kelvix
User: kelvix
Date: 2010-04-20 11:14 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
What constitutes "healthy"? Low in fat/saturated fat, low in sugar, high in vitamins or other useful nutritional minerals, low in artificial flavourings, preservatives or colourings, having a low GI?

Is going without a breakfast even healthier? Substituting it with a cup of black coffee?

Because my boy refuses to eat that which he dislikes, I walk the middle line with breakfast cereal. It is a crunchy oat with chocolate nuggets in combination - with ordinary natural yoghurt. It's the least sweetened version I could find - but I am reassured by the fact that at 2 going on 3, he does need the fats, the sugars and the slow-release energy combinations.

And there are no crisps in the house, and rarely any biscuits, so he has to make do with raisins and apples for snacking. Poor deprived child. He thinks cherry tomatoes are the Best Thing.

Yes, he will eat cake. He does often get confused by sweets though - because a lot of the time he has never seen them before.

And he does rather like Chocomel [1] - again, that's not exactly "healthy" but once in a while is not so bad.


[1] don't tell the purists, but I dilute it with more milk...
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The Bellinghman
User: bellinghman
Date: 2010-04-20 11:27 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Heretic! They'll kick you out of the Netherlands. And him a poor Dutch lad too - you're corrupting him with your foreign ways. Why, I expect the child protection people are on their way right now.

As for the fats - avoiding saturated fats and hydrogenated vegetable oils seems to be the way. As far as I can see, margarine is no healthier than butter regarding the type of fat - an original vegetable oil may be healthier, but the process of hydrogenation appears to turn it into something biologically equivalent to animal fat.

There's a lot to be said for moderation, and the lack of sweets is probably good - there's not much point to 'empty' calories.

Is the cereal part of the standard breakfast, or part of a rotation?

Also conceded, what children require nutritionally is not what is optimal for an adult, and a higher than adult ratio of fats and sugars appears better for them, though doing what you're doing and looking for slow-release carbs is probably a good idea. By the sound of it, you've thought about the options and are doing a good job. I heartily expect Ben to end up a fine six footer.
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Kelvix
User: kelvix
Date: 2010-04-20 14:07 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
So far he doesn't appear to think the day has really started until the bowl with yoghurt has been put in front of him, mere microseconds after having been brought downstairs.

He can be persuaded that porridge is the equivalent, but I think he likes the marker of the same breakfast. Toast is not *right*. Nor is beschuit (which is what we have used instead of biscuits or rusks). Those are elevenses and peckish things.

Sometimes he eats the whole bowlful in one sitting. Other times he has 3 or 4 mouthfuls and gets distracted. If I leave the bowl on the table, he comes back to it in an hour and enthusiastically swoffles what is left.

Until about a year ago, his standard weaning + breakfast was 2 weetabix, full fat milk and a banana - he got enthusiastic for the crunchy combination after he saw M eating it.

So - not much variation. I expect there is probably something wrong with that. But then - he's been a year on the current choice, so it may be that he's just angling for cheese sandwiches for breakfast... or breakfast gingercake...
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ewx
User: ewx
Date: 2010-04-20 18:25 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
Err. ISTM that concentrating on sugar to the exclusion of all else is no more sensible than concentrating on fat to the exclusion of all else.
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born from jets!!!
User: catness
Date: 2010-04-20 20:26 (UTC)
Subject: (no subject)
At least you get sugar.

Here in the US, I find it hard to locate packaged products that do not contain "High Fructose Corn Syrup" instead of sugar. Maddening, really.
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